A defence of alphabetical CSS | Eric Bailey

I am not a fan of alphabetical CSS, but Eric does a really solid job of arguing why, right now, it may be the best option. The short version is that CSS remains so woefully underutilised and misunderstood across the industry that anything other than alphabetical – a system that requires no domain-specific knowledge – is bound to fail. It's a depressing but well-reasoned argument.

Alphabetical is easy enough to pick up and have an organization repeat as a convention without having to invest too much time on upskilling an entire team on CSS theory.

On why pushing more "correct" solutions can be damaging to the client/team you're trying to help:

I think this is an important thing a lot of people get wrong. You want to set up something sustainable, but also not pour your own energy into making the right thing in the wrong way just to satisfy your own personal desires.

I just really love this definition of CSS:

The reality is that [CSS] is the programming language used to give ideas shape.

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  • I am not a fan of alphabetical CSS, but Eric does a really solid job of arguing why, right now, it may be the best option. The short version is that CSS remains so woefully underutilised and […]
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