How to Fix a Broken Embedded Flickr Album

I recently had need to embed a Flickr album, as I’ve done many times before. When I published the article, however, the album was broken and only showed a single image. Odd, sure, but I figured I had just copied the wrong embed code; an hour later and I was fairly certain I hadn’t.

The Problem

What I wanted was a gallery that showed all the photos in the Flickr album in order, with left and right arrow-buttons for navigation. Something like this:

Kew Gardens & Science Museum

Looks great, simple to use and what I’ve always had when using the Flickr embed codes in the past. The problem, though, was that instead of a nice gallery I just had this:

Kew Gardens & Science Museum

Looks similar, but it’s just a static image linked to the album page on my Flickr profile; there’s no way to scroll or navigate through the photos. Weird right! A few hours Googling around the subject later and the bad news is that the issue is frequently encountered, but not consistent, so doesn’t appear to be considered as a bug. The good news, though, is that you can manually force an embed code to behave in the ‘correct’ way, you just need to know how.

How to Fix It

Full thanks should be directed at Flickr user studyabroadwmu who posted the missing piece to the puzzle in a Flickr support thread last year.

The trick is noticing the seemingly innocuous difference in the anchor tag of the embed code generated for the two albums above:

<a title="Kew Gardens & Science Museum" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/161720506@N06/albums/72157669217526758" data-flickr-embed="true" data-footer="true">

As opposed to:

<a title="Kew Gardens & Science Museum" href="https://www.flickr.com/gp/161720506@N06/y5R7Wu" data-flickr-embed="true" data-footer="true">

Why the bottom embed code was generated using some kind of URL shortening is not clear, but that’s the root of the issue. Want to fix it, just open the album in Flickr and take a look at the URL in the browser bar, which in this case would be:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/161720506@N06/sets/72157669217526758/

Now copy that and paste it over the value of the href attribute and, hey presto, you should have a working embedded gallery once again!

Autumn Colours at Kew Gardens

Kew Gardens & Science Museum

What’s this, a new article? Containing a new Flickr album? Well, who would have thought!

So yes, I’m back, hopefully with some more frequent updates (at long last) and definitely with quite a bit more photography related posts. Life has gone through some fairly big changes since my last post back in February, big enough to warrant their own post at some point. The brief version is that I’m now unemployed and living in London; exciting times!

That has meant time to finally sit down and begin working through the backlog of photographs. It has also meant a fiber internet connection! I’d hoped to have started publishing albums again as soon as we were connected, and pretty much had the above ready to go, but then I hit a bump in the road. Flickr has decided that my log-in details are no longer correct and Yahoo has deleted my associated email account. It doesn’t seem to matter that I still have access to the backup email account, the linked mobile phone or that I could provide private information on the account, after a protracted fight with Yahoo customer support I was left with two options: delete the original account or ignore it. The former sounded appealing, but a quirk of the Flickr back-end means that deleting the account doesn’t free up the username or URL, the two elements I most want…

So, whilst theAdhocracy on Flickr will live on, it will have to do so on a new profile, with a new name: theAdhocracyUK. I still hold out some hope that the recent acquisition of Flickr by SmugMug may allow greater flexibility in the future, but until then I invite you to follow the new me. As with my last outing on the platform, any images predominantly features friends/family (you know, memory shots rather than composed “photographs”) will only be visible if you’re following me and have been approved.

I’ve re-uploaded the original three albums, even taking the opportunity to add better captions and tweak a few of the exposures along the way. With that all (finally) complete, I’m back to where I thought I was two months ago and can begin sharing some new photos. So, with that said, up top I’ve uploaded a few shots from our trip to London last October.

We came across to London primarily to visit Kew Gardens with Alison’s parents, which was my first time to the area. To say we enjoyed it would be an understatement; in fact, we recently became members! Despite being mid-autumn, the beds were in full flower and offset beautifully against the turning leaves, plus the Hive sculpture (well pictured above) was fascinating. It was a great day out and a very fun visit.

The rest of the photos were taken at the Science Museum in South Kensington, predominantly in an exhibit they were running at the time on Asia/India. It was both wonderfully put together and extremely informative, plus the general design of the museum really impressed me. Overall then, a very successful weekend and I’m glad to finally be able to share it; expect more to come to Flickr soon (plus 500px and Instagram).

Vinyl Scratchings [#20]

Yes, I am one of those irritating people that have decided to resurrect an audio format that, by all rights, should be long extinct. And, further yes, I’m also now going to complain about my irrational decision and why the industry is ruining it. Have you got the rage and sighs out? Okay, let’s continue.

First of all, because it’s likely the number one question any vinyl ‘enthusiast’ (I am not a fan of that term) gets asked, why do I buy vinyl? Well, it isn’t because of ‘superior’ sound quality. I don’t have the time, or money, to become an audiophile. No, honestly, it’s because I like collecting stuff and I like music. Vinyl collections are just more attractive to me than CD collections, although I have quite a large one of those too, and I find no joy in having a large digital media collection at all. Plus, the audio industry was forever changed the moment Spotify launched. I have subscriptions to both Spotify Premium and Amazon Music, which combined account for over 90% of my music listening habits. I no longer have any need to buy music.

Still, sometimes, I want to buy music. Most of the time it’s so I can support a specific artist; the rest of the time it’s because a given record has some personal significance to me. As a result, my vinyl collection is not full of one-time release, special edition recordings from bands you’ve never heard of. It’s largely main stream, best selling albums from the likes of Linkin Park, Muse and the Killers. Still, because I’m part of the ‘digital generation’, a lot of these records are the first time I’ve owned some of my, personally, favourite and most influential music. As a result, I want these purchases to be special; I look at them as more than just ‘buying an album’ but as recognition of an album or artist that means something to me.

Yet, despite the enduring revival of the format, it seems that the prestige of vinyl is being forgotten. Most modern releases are a simple sleeve, with identical cover art to the CD (often not even at increased resolution), and nothing more. The records of the 70’s and 80’s delighted consumers with multi-hinge fold outs, ornate lyrics sheets, in depth leaflets about the album, artist, designers and everyone inbetween. Cover art was detailed and extravagant, with the entire package often being pain staking lay designed. Vinyl records felt special, rewarding your purchase with a product that somehow felt more than just an album. Conversely, modern CD albums tend to contain more of these features than the vinyl issue does.

This mass market reaction is predictable but should, theoretically, be matched in step by a shift in cost. However, far from making vinyl records cheaper, it seems that the resurgence of interest in the format has increased the expected RRP. As vinyl has become cool and collectable again, the price, particularly of sought after albums (even reissues), has steadily risen.

The result is a market where vinyl records now feel less special whilst costing more. There are some benefits to the mass market, such as the inclusion of digital download codes with vinyl purchases, but even these are hit and miss with little thought. A recent selection of albums I’ve bought contained a download code that had already expired (Sir Sly), a code with no corresponding website (Watsky) and a digital download given at lower than CD quality compression (Glitch Mob). Vinyl albums, especially ones that hold their value, tend to have long shelf lives, tend to be bought by people who have a decent understanding of audio quality and are largely purchased by fans of that artist. None of those interactions made me feel like my purchase mattered to the bands involved. They left a bitter taste in the mouth.

There are those that do get it, though. Cat Power’s Sun is a fantastic example of a vinyl that rewards the consumer. It comes with both a CD and digital download code (amazing) and the specially designed insert sleeves include lyrics, credits, interesting information and much more. Plus, it looks great and sounds amazing, making the purchase so much more special. Also, Florence & The Machine Lungs which has a proper bi-fold sleeve and some stunning album art. Ironically, both cost much less than other, rather disappointing vinyls. Hopefully artists will begin to take pride in the way their art is presented again as they used to.

Willow, Wetlands & Nostell Priory [#11]

Nostell Estate & Wetlands Centre

Edit (21/05/18): Due to an issue with Yahoo, I no longer have access to the Flickr account linked below. If you’re interested in my photography, check me out at theAdhocracyUK instead.


Well, despite my best intentions, it has been almost a year since I last finished and uploaded a Flickr album. There are many, many albums at 90% complete or over, but I tend to find that I lose interest right at the final hurdle. It’s something I’m working on, much like my writing (speaking of, we’re at #10 and counting!), so hopefully there will be plenty more posts like this in 2017.

The first half of the pictures were taken in the grounds of Nostell Priory, a National Trust property located near Doncaster which we dropped into on our way back from visiting friends in Durham. It was a flying visit, really just allowing us to break the trip and stretch our legs, so I’d say Nostell has a lot more to offer than what we experienced, but what we did see was rather charming. I’m not sure if it was the Spring flowers coming into bloom or the rarely nice weather, but the grounds had a slightly enchanted feel to them. The various follies, Medieval quarry and distinctly Victorian concept of the Menagerie Garden combined to imbue certain areas with a quality reminiscent of Bethesda’s Elder Scrolls series. It felt like the house and grounds had been built on top of a more fantastical, ancient and much more secretive estate. I imagine it would have been an amazing place to grow up in and would definitely recommend it, whether for a full day out with the whole family or just an idle wander.

The second half of the album is comprised of a small number of shots from another brief outing, this time to the Willows & Wetlands Visitor Centre. Run by Coates English Willow, the centre is really just a shop and small (but very pleasant) café that allows access down onto a part of the Somerset Levels. There is a small museum and plenty of information displays, but we didn’t spend too much time with either. Instead, we spent our time exploring the various trails through the surrounding farmland, woods and down onto the flats themselves. Various willow animals have been scattered amongst the paths, all of which were wonderfully well set (I was particularly fond of the swooping eagle). Again, we didn’t spend a huge amount of time at the centre but I would definitely say it was worthwhile. Seeing an area of Somerset which still actively pumps the fens and plants up the willow beds was really interesting and, in its own way, quite beautiful.